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Title: Corneal Transplantation - where are we now?
Dr Douglas Lam
MBBS, MRCSEd, FCOphthHK, FHKAM (Ophthalmology)
Biography:
Dr. Douglas Lam is currently a partner at the Hong Kong Ophthalmic Associates and is one of the few corneal surgeons who performs advanced corneal transplants in Hong Kong. He studied at Yale University as an undergraduate majoring in Molecular Biology. Then he completed his medical degree at The University of Hong Kong and subsequently his ophthalmology training at the Hong Kong Eye Hospital. He underwent his fellowship training at Johns Hopkins University in U.S.A. and he learned his lamellar surgeries under Professor Massimo Busin in Italy. He is currently a board member of the Hong Kong Lion’s Eyebank. As the honorary assistant professor at The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Dr. Lam continues his research on toric intraocular lens, ocular surface diseases, and dry eyes, and he has published scientific papers in various ophthalmic publications. His centre houses the first and most advanced dry eye diagnostics in Hong Kong.
Title: Corneal Transplantation - where are we now?
Cornea is the foremost transparent tissue of the globe. It serves as protection to the internal structures of the globe, and it has the highest refractive power in the eye. Various corneal diseases can lead to cloudiness and opacities of the cornea, thereby affecting vision. Although prompt diagnosis and treatment may reverse the conditions, at times the corneal opacities may become irreversible and permanent. The primary purpose of corneal transplantation is to improve vision through the replacement of the diseased cornea with a clear high quality graft. Traditionally, full thickness penetrating keratoplasty (PK) remained the only procedure in replacing the cornea. However, the introduction of lamellar keratoplasty (LK) in replacing selective layer of the cornea has gained popularity among corneal surgeons. Endothelial keratoplasties (EK) are performed in corneas with endothelial cell diseases, while anterior lamellar keratoplasties (ALK) are done in corneas with pathologies which do not involve the endothelial layer. Recent advances in femtosecond lasers have provided new strategies in corneal tissue preparation and corneal wound designs. Finally, sterile corneas and keratoprosthesis are used in complex corneal diseases in order to salvage vision.
Title: Contact Lens Myopia Control
Dr Jeffrey J. Walline
OD, PhD
Biography:
Dr. Jeffrey J. Walline is the Associate Dean for Research at The Ohio State University College of Optometry. He received his Doctor of Optometry degree from the University of California, Berkeley School of Optometry, and he received his Master’s and PhD degrees from The Ohio State University College of Optometry. Dr. Walline has led several pediatric contact lens studies, and he is the Study Chair of the Bifocal Lenses In Nearsighted Kids (BLINK) Study, a National Eye Institute-sponsored randomized clinical trial to investigate the myopia control effects of soft multifocal contact lenses.
Title: Contact Lens Myopia Control
An increase in the prevalence of myopia has heightened the awareness of myopia and its effects on ocular health and daily activities. This lecture will provide some insight into soft bifocal and orthokeratology myopia control, including tips for optimizing myopia control, talking to parents, and determining the modality that may be best for an individual patient. Evidence regarding kids’ abilities to wear contact lenses will be presented, as well as subjective and objective information about kids’ vision while wearing soft bifocal contact lenses. At the end of this lecture, eye care practitioners will be able to confidently offer contact lenses as a method of myopia control for young children.
Title: Infra-red, Interferometry and OCT – new imaging and analysis of the anterior segment
Nicholas J. Rumney
MScOptom FCOptom DipTP(IP) ProfCertMedRet
FAAO FEAOO FIACLE FBCLA
Biography:
Nicholas (Nick) Rumney is currently in a full-scope, award-winning private practice in Hereford. Nick is a third generation optometrist who graduated from Cardiff completed an MSc in low vision in Melbourne. He has been a Fellow of the American Academy of Optometry (AAO) since 1995.
Recognising that a stimulus was needed to encourage an interest in optometric therapeutics, he was instrumental in bringing Lou Catania from the US to the UK for a multi-centre roadshow that was seen by over 700 optometrists. Nicholas was part of the General Optical Council (GOC) team that developed the regulations underpinning specialist therapeutic legislation and in 2012 he qualified as an Independent Prescriber in Therapeutics. His practice is the only one in the UK dually registered for Investors in People and ISO 9000 and was the first in the UK to introduce Spectral domain 3D-OCT and he regularly presents on this technology at conferences.
In 2008 he was appointed to the AAO Fellowship International Admissions Committee and in 2013 was promoted to Chair. He is the current Chair of the UK National Committee of Optometry Giving Sight.
Title: Infra-red, Interferometry and OCT – new imaging and analysis of the anterior segment
Clinicians have been presented with a plethora of new technologies for imaging and analysing the body and nowhere more so than the eye. The use of infra-red digital imaging coupled to a slit lamp or other dedicated camera has meant the meibomian glands can be viewed in vivo. The advent of video interferometry has meant that the structure and behaviour of the tear film and specifically the lipid layer can be analysed dynamically.
Simultaneously with the emergence of OCT as a method for examining the posterior segment the possibilities for anterior segment imaging and measurement began to be appreciated. All manufacturers rapidly developed methods of adapting their instruments to anterior segment imaging ranging from simple forehead spacers to extra lens systems.
Many areas of the anterior segment lend themselves to OCT analysis such as; tear prism measurement, pachymetry, assessment of the angle and anterior chamber depth, topographical representation, imaging the patency of iridotomies and even viewing the lens and anterior vitreous. Contact lens research has also been greatly enhanced by the use of OCT coinciding with the re-emergence of scleral and semi-scleral lens fitting.
This presentation will explain the development of new imaging techniques and describe their use through images and cases seen in practice.
Title: How to Mix Oil and Water – The Meibomian Gland in Sickness and Health
Prof. Eric Papas
PhD BScOptom DipCL FAAO
Biography:
Eric Papas is Professorial Visiting Fellow at the School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. He holds degrees in physics from the University of Birmingham, optometry from the University of Manchester and a doctorate from the University of New South Wales. Most of his career has been spent in research related to contact lenses and the ocular surface, during which time he was one of the inventors of silicone hydrogel contact lenses and discovered the link between limbal hyperaemia and oxygen. Formerly Executive Director of Research and Development at the Brien Holden Vision Institute and Vision CRC, he has worked with all the major companies in the contact lens field and has made significant contributions to the development of several contact lenses and lens care products. He recently received the Max Schapero Award from the section on Cornea, Contact Lenses and Refractive Technologies of the American Academy of Optometry in recognition of his contributions to the field. He has published over 100 articles and book chapters, holds 11 patents and has written over 160 confidential research reports. Among his current interests are presbyopia, the ocular surface and meibomian gland, ocular discomfort, measurement of subjective responses and postgraduate education. He has mentored over 100 students in research projects at both undergraduate and postgraduate level. He serves as Associate Editor for Contact Lens & Anterior Eye, Associate Topical Editor for Optometry & Vision Science and sits on the editorial board of both Clinical & Experimental Optometry and Eye & Contact Lens. A Council Member of the International Society for Contact Lens Research, he is also a member of the Clinical and Scientific Advisory Committee of the Center for Eye Health, UNSW. A regular speaker at scientific and educational meetings worldwide, he also appears as an expert on the ocular surface on TV and radio.
Title: How to Mix Oil and Water – The Meibomian Gland in Sickness and Health
Dry eye is one of the most common ocular complaints suffered by people throughout the world and it is particularly prevalent in Asian countries. Current opinion, views the loss of normal function in the meibomian glands as the major contributory factor in this potentially debilitating disease. While this premise is apparently straightforward, it has become clear that translating it into effective clinical management strategies requires a deeper grasp of the actions of these glands, as well as the oily secretions they produce. This awareness is prompting a re-evaluation of the functional behavior of the tear film and the role of meibum, as well as focusing research efforts into meibomian gland activity. The task in this presentation is to give an overview of this landscape as a background to our own work which has attempted to provide clarity in three main areas, first by establishing the natural history of the meibomian gland, second by looking at how its structure and function interact with the subjective symptoms reported by dry eye sufferers and third by gauging the effect of external influences, such as contact lens wear.
Title: Offering your patient a wonderful journey
Vincent Chui
PDip (Optom), MPhil, FAAO, FBCLA
Biography:
Mr Vincent Chui graduated from the Hong Kong Polytechnic University in 1992. He obtained his MPhil Degree from the same institution later. He joined the School of Optometry as a clinical optometrist in 2000 after few years of private practice. He was subsequently promoted to Associate Consultant Optometrist in 2009. Over the years, Mr Chui has been focusing on clinical teaching as well as optometric specialty development. He was frequently invited to give lectures in continuing education courses and seminars locally and overseas. He has mentored a number of residents specializing in anterior eye and specialty contact lens fitting. Since 2012, Mr Chui has been running his own practice. He has also been appointed by the School of Optometry as an Adjunct Associate Professor. He is a fellow of the America Academy of Optometry and the British Contact Lens Association.
Title: Offering your patient a wonderful journey
Patient’s journey is an important aspect to patient experience. It is one of the key factors that drives the loyalty of a patient to a health care provider. In order to optimize a patient’s journey, it is important to manage carefully on every single point of interaction between the practice and the patient. This presentation will give an overview of the patient’s journey regarding the contact lens service in an optometric practice. The issues that may help optimize the patient’s journey will be discussed. These include ways to elicit patient’s symptoms, tools for presenting clinical results to the patient, identifying and meeting the patient’s needs and proper training to supporting staff.